Disneys Frozen Movie Review: Kids Movie Review


Kids Movie Review of Disney’s Frozen. Amelie reviews the movie Frozen, eats popcorn and talks about the story and favorite parts of the film. A great film re…
Video Rating: 3 / 5

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Editor’s Pick:

World War II for Kids: A History with 21 Activities (For Kids series)

Now more than ever, kids want to know about our country’s great struggles during World War II. This book is packed with information that kids will find fascinating, from Hitler’s rise to power in 1933 to the surrender of the Japanese in 1945. Much mo

Disneys Frozen Movie Review: Kids Movie Review

Price: $ 9.01


9 thoughts on “Disneys Frozen Movie Review: Kids Movie Review

  1. Amazing review!!! Great job Amelie! 

  2. 65 of 65 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    What it was like for kids to live during World War II, January 28, 2004
    By 
    Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) –
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    This review is from: World War II for Kids: A History with 21 Activities (For Kids series) (Paperback)
    “World War II for Kids: A History with 21 Activities” really has three key components. First, there is a history of World War II from Hitler’s rise to power in 1933 to the surrender of the Japanese in 1945. Second, Richard Panchyk provides excerpts from actual wartime letters written to and by troops on both sides along with personal anecdotes from people who lived through the war. Finally, there are 21 activities that can show young readers how it felt to live through World War II, both on the battlefield and on the Home Front.
    Actually, the first function is the least impressive part of “World War II for Kids,” although Panchyk provides a solid history of the war. It is just that the personal writings and recollections, along with the activities, are where Panchyk goes beyond what you would find in your standard American history textbook, which is why this is an excellent supplemental volume. Teachers can certainly use the activities and quote from the letters found in this volume to give students more of a sense of what it was like to live during that time.
    The 21 activities are fairly interesting and cover a variety of subjects. Some are fairly complex, such as substituting a potato for an incendiary bomb and following the instructions on how to extinguish it, or staging a radio adventure program, while others are relatively simply, such as drawing a recruiting poster. There is an exercise in code breaking, learning how to camouflage, making a ration kit, going on a reconnaissance mission, figuring oat a coastal defense, the physics of dropping bombs, and a game that helps demonstrate the difference between mortar and howitzer fire versus anti-tank and anti-aircraft fire. There are also “Home Front” activities like making a bandage, putting together a care package, growing a Victory Garden, sending V-Mail, and extending butter, as well as a couple of activities having to do with the Holocaust by making a Jewish star and trying to find good hiding places in your home for the student and an adult helper.
    Obviously some of these activities are going to be more practical and more beneficial than others, but Panchyk has made an attempt to come up with different ways of giving his young readers an idea of what it was like for kids and adults during World War II. Again, while young readers can certainly read this book and try the activities on their own, “World War II for Kids” is even better suited as a resource for teachers to use when teaching the pivotal events of World War II. Comparing what life was like for their grandparents during that war as opposed to the rather limited impact on their lives today during the war on terrorism could be quite an eye opener for young readers.

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  3. 40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    7 year old loves this book, June 3, 2003
    By A Customer
    This review is from: World War II for Kids: A History with 21 Activities (For Kids series) (Paperback)
    My 7 year old son is a WWII fanatic and loves this book. It discusses not only events in the war itself, but also the impact of the war on life in the U.S. The activities encourage kids to think about far-reaching effects of war, not just the exciting battles.

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  4. 21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    A Decent Introduction on the Subject, August 18, 2008
    By 
    T. Leach “Jr.” (Mid-West) –
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    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: World War II for Kids: A History with 21 Activities (For Kids series) (Paperback)
    This book generally delivers on its purpose, which is to introduce young readers to the important topic of World War II. In my estimation, if your child isn’t already interested, this book may not necessarily awaken him or her (Ambrose’s “The Good Fight” is better), but for your interested son or daughter, ages 8 to 13 or so, this is a useful resource. As a history it is pretty light, but it is not a bad overview, and provides some great insight into the Home Front and other non-traditional perspectives on the War. There are a few WW-II themed crafts and activity ideas, all of which are pointless and the very type of things that children and their parents ignore the world over.

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