Good ForTwo 2015 review | TELEGRAPH Vehicles




Chris Knapman reviews the 2015 Good ForTwo. Is it nonetheless the ultimate metropolis car?

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35 thoughts on “Good ForTwo 2015 review | TELEGRAPH Vehicles

  1. A great way to make the automotive industry a better industry is by junking these clunkers.

    1 Contact your local junkyard that it's a shitty car and needs to be junked.

    2 Contact the US Army to use these junkers for target practice with tanks & APCs etc

    Junk all smart cars! Put them in a car crusher and crush them!

  2. WHY, WHY HAVE THEY DONE THAT.  Put a manual in.  That's part of the fun of driving a smart.  the sequential gearbox.  The rally style gearbox.

  3. Great that they ditched the terrible original gearbox. I hadn't realized that was true of the newer models. (You can learn to cope with it, but it's exactly that; you have to learn to.)

    Interesting. I'll have to take the new one for a test drive sometime.

    Thanks for the review!

  4. na i like the last shape better! & i like the semi automatic gearbox as well in the last model… this new versions front end is too sqaure… i like the looks of the last one better, & thats why i own one coz its the dogs nuts ;)

  5. Just get a Renault Twingo FFS. This smart is just a Renault Twingo inside except they made it uglier and more expensive.

    Absolutely 0 reason to buy one.

  6. I love mine,but they are not for a one car person I think.i don't think I would love it as much if it was all I had

  7. Still not the prettiest car in the stable but definitely an improvement on the previous version! Also, I can't help but appreciate a car that's easy to park.

  8. Ive owned a Smart ForTwo for the past five years, its been very reliable and very cheap to run transportation, always adding a sense of fun and occasion to every journey I've made.
    There are two big reasons why i will not be buying the new MK3 model tested here.

    The first is its rather ridiculous asking price for the standard basic model, starting at just over £11200 before you add on some nice extras.
    That was the main reason for the demise of the equally brilliant Toyota IQ, it was simply too expensive, in an already flooded market with equally able city cars such as the VW Up, Seat Mii, Toyota Aygo, Peuguot 108, Fiat 500, Hyundai 10 and quite a few more.

    Secondly and most importantly in my case, Mercedes dropped their brilliantly executed 799CC Turbo diesel from the Smart range in early October 2014.

    You see, I've owned a Smart CDI for just over five years, and on long trips it easily tops 80mpg, and does around 50-55mpg around town.

    The new Smart ForTwo is petrol only, and even though that will not be a deal breaker for your average owner, it is for me.

    At well over £11000 for the basic Smart, i will be very surprised if it survives longterm.

    The car has been in production for 17yrs and in today's cut and thrust city car market, i will be surprised if it finds many new owners.

    Cost is the main issue for most potential City Car owners, and when virtually every city car on the market costs less than £11000  HOW CAN IT SURVIVE ?

  9. Sadly, it now looks like a Japanese cartoon or the Bastard Child of the Toyota IQ, internally and externally. Losing it's unique design integrity and killing it's sales potential, real shame  !!!

  10. Nice review but why are u complaining that the 1 litre turbo petrol is slow with a 0 to 60 mph time of 10 seconds? The one you were driving does the 0 to 60 sprint in over 14 seconds besides 10 seconds is pretty quick for this kind of car especially wen u compare it to an alfa brera which takes 9 seconds even with a bigger engine and more horsepower , please get with reality people aren't going to buy this car for how fast it goes they buy it because of its economy and ease of drivability in cities 

  11. Parking nose to kerb works in countries other than GB, draw your own conclusions.

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